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Take a look back at Franklin County’s history through news and photos that appeared in local newspapers 25, 50, and 100 years ago on September 21st.

25 Years Ago

September 21, 1994  Wednesday

“Queen Anne Look Captures Elegance of the Period.”

CHAMBERSBURG – REMEMBER WHEN?  (1994 Decor)

The Queen Anne period was ‘considered the age of elegance perhaps because it was a time of transition from the flamboyant English Baroque style to a more dignified, queenly style. 

Though there were no great innovations in architecture or art during Queen Anne’s reign, somehow this regal lady had such influence that the period is known as one of desirable elegance. 

The era emphasized and demanded first rate materials and workmanship, rendering the furnishings not only stylish, but high quality. 

We’re all familiar with the Queen Anne look. Perhaps a brief, but all-encompassing description of typical Queen -Anne furniture is simple elegance with a domesticated flair, set up on graceful, cabriole legs. 

Colors typical of this era are strong and dark. Paints at that time were limited to olive greens, browns, grays and off-whites. The printed fabric; colors were reds, browns, purples and blacks.

Picture this wall: Plain, but rich paneling with a chair rail or dividing line from about 13-length from the floor, crown molding, some arch-topped niches and a fireplace. Typical Queen Anne? The main giveaway is the arch-topped niches so popular to that style. 

Floors were usually covered with wood and topped with a very large area rug as opposed to wall-to-wall carpeting. The rugs were intricately patterned with fringe on two or four sides. 

Velvet has had its ups and downs in the fashion circles of interior design, but it was quite popular in the Queen Anne era. Coarse cottons and damasks fit in here well also. 

All this describes a heavy look, yet the furnishings managed to have an airy look about them, perhaps because they were all up on those cabriole legs. 

Besides those curly sort of bowed legs, wing backs on chairs and small sofas also were popular. 

Ornamentations of that day included pictures in gilt frames and these pictures were portraits (very popular), landscapes and hunting scenes. Pottery and porcelain was most often blue and white and there was always a vase with flowers somewhere. In summer, the floral graced the front of the fireplace since it was not in use. 

Mirrors were used a lot also, particularly small mirrors with wood frames and tall mirrors with arched tops. Lighting was dim since the main illumination at that time came from candles.

50 Years Ago

September 21, 1969  Sunday

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“Elected At Wilson”

CHAMBERSBURG – Two Lancaster area students have been elected to campus offices at Wilson College, Chambersburg, Pa. 

Margaret Lee Darras, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Russell Darras, 126 Highview Drive, Lancaster, will be president of the Sophomore Class. 

Kathleen Eshleman Shannon, daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. James G. Shannon, 215 S. Locust St., Lititz, will serve as Junior Class representative of the Athletic Association.

100 Years Ago

September 21, 1919 Monday

“WANTED – Census Workers”

Government wants thousands of census clerks before January. -Salaries range from $1140 to $1260 first year. Men-women 18 to 50 can apply. Chambersburg will hold examinations on Nov. 15. A list of positions are free if you write immediately to the Franklin Institute, Dept. 388-T, Rochester, N. T. 

********** EDITOR’S NOTE ***********
Below is an example of the information that was gathered for the on the 1920 census:

Frankliin County histoy

Looking Back

Looking Back: Franklin County’s History on October 15th

Take a look back at Franklin County’s history through news and photos that appeared in local newspapers 25, 50, and 100 years ago on October 15th.

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