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Take a look back at Franklin County’s history through news and photos that appeared in local newspapers 25, 50, and 100 years ago on Jan. 12th.

25 YEARS AGO.

January 12, 1995  Thursday

“Worthy Projects Win grant Money”

Borough Council invested $272,000 in the future of Chambersburg when it decided Wednesday night who would get federal grant money. A 1995 development block grant will help two community groups tutor youngsters, make borough buildings and playground areas accessible to the handicapped and rebuild Hollywell Avenue. It also will help a health center expand its building so it can serve more people and a not-for-profit foundation build homes for low-income people. “These are worthy projects, which in . the long run will be beneficial to Chambersburg,” said Council President Bernard Washabaugh at the end of council’s second hearing on allocating the grant money. Seven requests were made. Everyone received money. The $22,000 to Chambersburg Community Improvement Association will expand its tutoring programs, which Borough Council invested $272,000 in the future of Chambersburg when it decided Wednesday night who would get federal grant money. 

A 1995 development block grant will help two community groups tutor youngsters, make borough buildings and playground areas accessible to the handicapped and rebuild Hollywell Avenue. 

It also will help a health center expand its building so it can serve more people and a not-for-profit foundation build homes for low-income people. 

“These are worthy projects, which in the long run will be beneficial to Chambersburg,” said Council President Bernard Washabaugh at the end of council’s second hearing on allocating the grant money.   

Seven requests were made. Everyone received money. 

The $22,000 to Chambersburg Community Improvement Association will expand its tutoring programs, which currently help about 130youngsters.  It can add another 50 to 75. 

“We’ll be able to work with youngsters from first grade until they graduate, keeping them in school and giving them more opportunities to succeed,” said Mike Waters, CCIA president. “The grant money puts us years ahead of where we’d be if we had to come up with the money on our own.” 

Keystone Health Center plans to enlarge its building on South Seventh Street or build a new one.  It was given $24,000. 

Of the center’s patients, 32% (3,347) are borough residents, said Joanne Cochran, Keystone chief executive officer and president. 

Robert Wareham pushed for the health center allocation. As a teacher, he said, he’s seen youngsters who haven’t been to dentists or physicians. 

“Why should children be denied dental or health care because they can’t pay? I’ve seen the results and it’s sad,” he said. “Keystone does a fantastic job, taking care of these children who are turned down by other physicians and dentists because their families can’t pay.”

Other grant recipients: 

• Building Our Pride In Chambersburg, $70,500, to help purchase the Chambersburg Senior Center and start a parenting program.
• Chambersburg Borough, $45,000, to make Borough Hall, Memorial Park and Eugene C. Clarke Jr. Community Center accessible to the handicapped.
• Borough Recreation Department, $70,000, to add a drinking fountain, playground equipment, bathroom, tire swings and wheelchair swings for the handicapped.
• South Central Community Action Program, $23,500, put in a playground in the homeless shelter on South Main Street
• Borough, $10,000. to help fund the rebuilding of Hollywell Avenue.
• Leon Weiner and Associates, $7,000, to build a child’s play area at a low-income family apartment complex near Orchard Drive.

50 Years Ago

January 12, 1970  Monday

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“Area Exhibitors Farm Show Honors Win”

CHAMBERSBURG – Area exhibitors carried off prizes in early judging at the Pennsylvania Farm Show which opened this morning in the Farm Show complex, Harrisburg. 

The Franklin County Horticultural Society won first place in the county apple exhibition class for the seventh consecutive year and received a $150 prize. 

Second place in the class went to Adams County while Snyder County took third. Grand champion bushel apple honors were won by Mohr’s Orchard, Fogelsville, Lehigh County. The bushel of apples will be presented to the Governor. 

William Elliott Jr., Willow Hill, and Denton Ashway Jr., 251 Glen St., only Franklin County exhibitors in the Christmas tree competition, carried off a number of prizes. 

Ashway took first places in White Pine and Fraser Fir, second places in Austrian Pine and Norway Spruce, and fifth places in Douglas Fir and Scotch Pine.

Elliott took a second in Blue Spruce, a third in Austrian Pine and a fourth in White Spruce. 

Gov. Raymond P. Shafer said he had skipped breakfast in order to do justice to the many edibles as he made a preview tour of the Pennsylvania Farm Show Sunday. 

The official pronouncement of the governor was that the show is “the finest of them all.” 

Shafer and a delegation of dignitaries toured the multi-million dollar exhibit of farm machinery and equipment and the acres of animals and poultry pens before a former ceremony in the main arena. 

During the next five days, if precedent holds true, some 450,-000 to 700,000 persons will make the tour of what has become recognized as the largest free indoor agricultural exposition under one roof in the United States. 

As Shafer and his entourage made the walking tour of the enormous exhibit areas young and old fanners could be seen scrubbing prize cattle with soap and water, shearing their sheep and otherwise preening their animals for the attention of the judges during the week. 

At the formal ceremony Shafer drew rounds of applause from the 5.000 or more persons gathered in the arena despite the sub-freezing temperatures and snow clogged highways when he said again: “I know you will agree with me that Pennsylvania is the No. 1 state in the nation.” 

Shafer said he intended to pursue with all vigor a recommendation of Sec. of Agriculture Leland H. Bull and Sec. of Community Affairs Joseph Barr that a bureau of Rural Affairs be established within the Dept of Agriculture. 

“This,” Shafer said, “would improve the capabilities of their departments to develop and implement cooperative programs.” 

The governor hailed what he termed a milestone last year when farm production reached $1 billion in Pennsylvania.

100 Years Ago

January 12, 1920  Monday

“Unknown Tramp – Dies in a Barn”

GREENCASTLE – A tramp whose identity could not be learned as there was nothing about him to show it, was found in a dying condition in Jacob Lesher’s barn in Antrim township.  Officer Baumgardner of Greencastle was notified, who with Dr. G. A. Sowell went to the Lesher farm. Upon arrival there they learned that the man had died. 

After getting the facts surrounding the death, Coroner Kinter decided that an inquest was unnecessary. A number of tramps at the county home were called to identify the man but their efforts failed. He was buried in the Potter’s field on Saturday.

Local History

Looking Back: Franklin County’s History on Jan. 26th

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Take a look back at Franklin County’s history through news and photos that appeared in local newspapers 25, 50, and 100 years ago on Jan. 26th.
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