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Take a look back at news and photos that occurred 25, 50, and 100 years ago on June 3rd in Franklin County, PA.

25 years Ago:

Friday, June 3, 1994

“Unveiling of 115 year-0ld-landmark set for late July”

Ray Depuy and ART president Becky Ault watch as the fountain is reassembled for the test run with water.
Ray Depuy and ART president Becky Ault watch as the fountain is reassembled for the test run with water.

Lancaster – The fountain is ready to return to Chambersburg – looking pretty good for a 115-year-old.

The Memorial Square Fountain has undergone a 7 month, $80,000 makeover at Lancaster restoration firm, specializing in large, delicate pieces. Art Research and Technology dismantled the fountain in November. The square’s centerpiece will come home in late June or early July. The inauguration is set for July 22, the start of ChambersFest.

On Wednesday three members of the Memorial Fountain Committee traveled to Lancaster to see the fountain. Inside ART, they saw the fountain working again, as water poured down from the top. It was reassembled to be tested and will be taken apart for its return trip to Chambersburg.

“It’s what we expected and more,” said Ray Depuy, committee chairman, looking at the 25-foot fountain “We are very fortunate that the company exists. They are very hard working.”

“I’m really pleased with it,” said member William D. Butts. “People will be surprised when they see it. I don’t believe they think it would be this beautiful.”

Beautiful indeed. People will be able to admire the intricate detail that the corrosion and several coats of paint have obscured for years. All prior coats of paint have been taken off. The fountain, and the accompanying figure of a Civil War soldier, now sport a shiny bronze color, thanks to a clear coat of bronze powder. Details on the seven-foot soldier are visible right down to his fingernails. “He’s never looked so good,” said Depuy.

Four swans and four cherub figures atop dolphins will spout farther than before. Also spouting will be four more figures in the basin.

Becky Ault, president of ART, said the casting of the fountain’s large dish was more eroded than expected.

“ART did a great job,” Butts said. He said the fountain is the focal point of downtown Chambersburg.

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50 Years Ago

Tuesday, June 3, 1969

“Surviving Veteran Marches in Parade”

Fayetteville Area News, Mrs. Myrna Lightfoot - Phone 263-4301.  Proud Grandfather - Fred J. Rock holds grandsons Allen (left) and Dale, as the trio takes a rest after the Memorial Day parade Friday.
Fayetteville Area News, Mrs. Myrna Lightfoot – Phone 263-4301. Proud Grandfather – Fred J. Rock holds grandsons Allen (left) and Dale, as the trio takes a rest after the Memorial Day parade Friday.

Pond Bank – Fred J. Rock can claim quite a distinction in this small, friendly community. He is the only surviving World War I veteran residing in Pond Bank. The Community was the scene of a Memorial Day parade, of which he was a participant.

Mr. Rock entered the Army in September 1917 and served with the 318th Supply Company, 79th Division. He held the rank of Wagoner. He took basic training at Camp Meade, Maryland.

In July 1918, his company landed in Brest, France. He was sent into action at the Lorraine sector in August of 1918 and returned home in November of that same year. His early life consisted of sawmill and lumbering employment. He worked at Landis Tool Company in Waynesboro, and recently retired from Letterkenny Army Depot after 15 years of service at age 70.

Mr. and Mrs. Rock have resided in Pond Bank most of their lives. They have two daughters, two sons, and eight grandchildren.

Editor’s note: “Wagoner” – was a driver, teamster – “Army vehicle transportation by animal consisting of wagons, ambulances, and escort wagons.

100 years Ago:

Tuesday, June 3, 1919

State Approves P.R.R. Purchase of the C.V.R.R.

The Public Service Commission today issued a certificate of public convenience approving the acquisition by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company of the corporate rights, franchises, privileges, and all the railroads and other corporate property, rights and credits of the Cumberland Valley Railroad Company. The approval is given in accordance with the agreement entered into by the two companies on January 22, 1919.

The Cumberland Valley Railroad runs from Harrisburg through Dauphin, Cumberland and Franklin Counties, and Washington County Maryland, connecting on the south bank of the Potomac River at Powell’s Bend with the Cumberland Valley and Martinsburg Railroad Company.

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