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Take a look back at Franklin County’s history through news and photos that appeared in local newspapers 25, 50, and 100 years ago on July 18.

25 YEARS AGO

Monday – July 18, 1994

These ducks aren't buying golf balls, they're being fed by Cheyenna Perry, 4. and her brother Justin, 8, on Sunday.  The children of Amy and Jamie Perry, the pair were selling golf balls in front of their Coldbrook Road, Fayetteville, home near Conocodell Golf Course, when they took time out to feed the fowl.
These ducks aren’t buying golf balls, they’re being fed by Cheyenna Perry, 4. and her brother Justin, 8, on Sunday. The children of Amy and Jamie Perry, the pair were selling golf balls in front of their Coldbrook Road, Fayetteville, home near Conocodell Golf Course, when they took time out to feed the fowl.

These ducks aren’t buying golf balls, they’re being fed by Cheyenna Perry, 4. and her brother Justin, 8, on Sunday. The children of Amy and Jamie Perry, the pair were selling golf balls in front of their Coldbrook Road, Fayetteville, home near Conocodell Golf Course, when they took time out to feed the fowl.

50 YEARS AGO

Friday – July 18, 1969

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THE THIRD MAN - Mike Collins, third man on the moon mission, will play a comparatively passive role - unless something goes wrong.  He stays behind in the Command Module while Armstrong and Aldrin prowl the lunar surface.  In case of trouble during the Lunar Module's descent, he will attempt to drop down and pluck Aldrin and Armstrong from the crippled vehicle.  If he fails he will be the only member of the trip capable of returning to earth.
THE THIRD MAN – Mike Collins, third man on the moon mission, will play a comparatively passive role – unless something goes wrong. He stays behind in the Command Module while Armstrong and Aldrin prowl the lunar surface. In case of trouble during the Lunar Module’s descent, he will attempt to drop down and pluck Aldrin and Armstrong from the crippled vehicle. If he fails he will be the only member of the trip capable of returning to earth.

“Crew Gets Extra Rest- Spaceship Hurtles to Twilight ​​​​Zone”

CHAMBERSBURG — The good ship Columbia raced unerringly toward the clutch of lunar gravity today, carrying three brave men toward a Saturday rendezvous with the moon and destiny. 

Everything was going so well with the Apollo 11 mission that ground controllers let. the astronauts sleep more than an hour past their appointed wakeup time. 

“How do all our systems look?” Edwin E. Aidrin Jr. asked on waking. 

“They’re looking great,” came the reply from the Aidrin, Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins had rested 11 hours.

Armstrong and Aidrin each reported eight solid hours of sleep, with Collins logging nine hours resting for the critical weekend exploration ahead.

While the astronauts slept, their spaceship hurled toward a so-called “twilight zone” in which the gravitational influence of the earth and moon is about equal.

At 11:22 p.m. EOT tonight, the moon will win the gravitational tug-of war and Apollo 11 will be in the grip of the moon’s gravity. The astronauts will pass through this invisible barrier when they are 43,495 miles from the moon and 214,402 miles from their shrinking home planet.

Once across this line, Apollo ll’s speed will increase from about 2.000 to 5,700 miles an hour as the pilots sweep toward the backside of the moon.

They are to fire themselves into moon orbit Saturday afternoon and a day later Armstrong and Aidrin are to fly a lunar landing craft, or LM, to the surface. Early Monday, they are to take iron’s first steps on another celestial body. 

Today’s major event occurred late in the day when Armstrong and Aldrin wiggle through a connecting tunnel into the LM. nicknamed Eagle, hitched nose-to-nose to the Columbia command ship. 

For two hours they are to check the systems of this spindly-legged lander. Mainly, they will look for damage that might have occurred Wednesday during the jolting liftoff from Cape Kennedy. 

If they find major damage, they will cancel their landing plans. However, Mission Control officials say. chances of this are remote.

Still a mystery was the Soviet Union’s unmanned Luna 15, orbiting just 71 miles above the moon’s surface. There was speculation that today or Saturday it might detach a capsule which would land, collect soil samples and take off to rejoin the mother ship for the trip back to earth.

American experts said such a maneuver would be a s\great technological feat. They feel the Soviet purpose in such a maneuver would be to demonstrate they can return rocks to earth automatically and less expensively than the $355 million Apollo 11 mission.

10YEARS AGO

Friday – July 18, 1919

PERSONALS

• J. frank Kump has returned to his home in east Washington Street after spending several weeks near Reading.
• Mrs. Carence Fegan of East Queen Street, who has been ill for several months, is now able to be about again after suffering a relapse
• Miss Amelia Guck, teacher at Linden Hall Seminary, is spending her vacation with her parents on North Franklin Street. 
• Miss Flora Haig of Texas is a guest in the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. Ed Frommeyer.

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